Workers Comp – Payday Loans VMR http://paydayloansvmr.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 05:04:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://paydayloansvmr.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/payday-loans-vmr-icon-150x150.png Workers Comp – Payday Loans VMR http://paydayloansvmr.com/ 32 32 Florida CFO steps in, urges court to uphold PTSD benefits for firefighters https://paydayloansvmr.com/florida-cfo-steps-in-urges-court-to-uphold-ptsd-benefits-for-firefighters/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 05:04:47 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/florida-cfo-steps-in-urges-court-to-uphold-ptsd-benefits-for-firefighters/ New You can now listen to the Insurance Journal articles!

Florida’s chief financial officer has stepped in amid a firefighters’ compensation appeal for mental stress, a decision the firefighter’s attorney called “unprecedented” and reflects the importance of the case.

If Florida is 1st The District Appeals Court upholds a compensation claims judge’s decision in the case that could block post-traumatic stress disorder treatment and furloughs for many firefighters, police officers and emergency workers, said chief financial officer Jimmy Patronis and plaintiffs’ attorney Geoff Bichler.

“It could create a horrific and crippling effect on PTSD claims,” ​​said Bichler, attorney for the plaintiff in the case, retired Brevard County firefighter Roger Williams.

“This case is particularly important because the 1st DCA has an opportunity to set a legal precedent in support of our brave firefighters across the state,” Patronis, who also serves as the state fire marshal, said in a statement this week after his office filed a an amicus curiae brief in Williams’ appeal. “PTSD is a serious challenge for many of our first responders because they see and deal with things that are unthinkable in the line of duty.”

patronis

The point of contention in the Williams case appears to stem from the fact that Florida has two laws that address the benefits of mental stress for responders: one has been in place since 2007 and only authorizes medical benefits for PTSD that is not accompanied by physical injury. .

A 2018 law that Patronis lobbied for passed after the mass shootings of Pulse nightclub and Parkland High School. It provides medical benefits and compensation for mental stress, even without the accompanying physical injury. But it also requires applicants to meet strict criteria and present compelling evidence of mental trauma.

Bichler and Patronis’ financial services department says compensation judge Michael Ring applied the wrong law, potentially setting a damaging precedent for first responders who need professional help.

A second very similar case, Jerome Patterson v. City of Jacksonville, is also pending before the 1st DAC. If the appeals court agrees that firefighters in these cases are not owed benefits, state firefighters can ask the Legislature to clarify the law, Bichler said.

About 11 PTSD claims filed under the 2018 statue have gone to trial, only three of which awarded benefits, according to a search of orders from Florida’s Office of Compensation Claims Judges.

This issue in the Williams case has not been tested at the appellate court level thus far.

The circumstances of the Williams case, as described in the court filing, reflect the searing events first responders often witness and the emotional toll such footage can take. The case file also shows how emotional issues outside of the workplace can contribute to the mental health of rescue workers, perhaps to the detriment of their compensation claims.

bichler

Roger Williams had been a firefighter with Brevard County Fire Rescue since 1999. He had worked on many horrific incidents, including a 19-year-old who committed suicide with a shotgun; a 3-year-old child killed by a car; a child with an amputated arm; and two people murdered with a hammer.

But two incidents, in particular, led to the 2021 claim, the competition judge explained. Williams responded to a truck fire in 2019. He could hear the driver screaming but couldn’t reach the man because of flames and an exploding gas tank. About 18 months later, Williams said he cracked up while working at the fire station and saw video on the station’s television monitor showing rescue scenes in the event of an accident. fire. The station also had photographs of fire scenes on the wall.

The firefighter said he began to feel short of breath and then collapsed crying. He also testified that he felt anxiety before his wedding day due to the size of the crowd, and in 2021 cried for hours after having a drink at a bar, the judge said.

Williams’ original claim for benefits sought compensation as well as medical benefits, but, crucially, the claim for compensation was later dropped. The county and its insurance claims administrator, Preferred Governmental Claims Solutions, denied the claim, arguing the stress was unrelated to Williams’ job.

Both parties brought in psychiatrists who examined Williams, his treatment history and his family history. Williams’ doctor said the truck fire and viewing videos of the scene of the fire at the fire station contributed to the man’s trauma. But, the doctor acknowledged, the videos and photos, which immediately preceded the compensation claim, did not appear to meet the rigorous criteria required by Florida’s 2018 law. The competition judge agreed.

These criteria, criticized by some mental health professionals as arbitrary and confusing, include “directly witnessing a death…which resulted in grievous bodily harm of a nature that shocks the conscience”.

The PTSD Act 2018 also requires a mental injury to be demonstrated by “clear and convincing evidence”. Another psychiatrist testified that Williams did not meet established medical criteria for PTSD.

Ultimately, Judge Ring ruled that the 2018 law applied. “I find that the plaintiff has failed to produce clear and convincing evidence that he suffered a mental or nervous injury as a manifestation of a compensable accident as required” by law. Ring denied the request and request for attorney fees for Williams’ lawyers.

Patronis’ amicus brief, written by DFS attorneys Cassidy Perdue and Katie Privett, argues the judge got it wrong. In claims in which only medical benefits are sought, 2007 state law section 112.1815(2)(a) applies, not the 2018 section known as 112.1815(5). ) (a), according to the brief.

“The Compensation Claims Judge erroneously concluded that Florida Statute Section 112.1815(5)(a) governs compensation for all PTSD claims for first responders,” DFS attorneys wrote. . “This finding is contrary to the clear and unambiguous language of the law and ignores the legislature’s intent to increase coverage for mental or nerve injuries suffered by first responders.”

The 2007 law does not require the higher burden of proof and “compelling evidence” when a claimant is only seeking medical benefits for a mental injury, the brief notes.

Attorneys for Brevard County and Preferred Government Claims could not be reached Tuesday for comment on the case.

It’s unclear how much the DFS amicus brief will have with the appeals court, or how likely the judges are to favorably consider the firefighters’ claims. A Florida judge not associated with the case said Tuesday that because Patronis is not often involved in cases, and because the amicus brief is clear and well-written, it could have an impact. The Department of Financial Services also houses the State Office of Insurance Regulation and its Workers’ Compensation Division.

In an editorial published a week ago, however, the South Florida Sun Sentinel newspaper blasted the 1st DCA for its decision on another first responder’s workers’ compensation claim. In Stephen Sargent v Bradford County, 1st DCA upheld a compensation judge’s decision that the sheriff’s deputy was not entitled to benefits after suffering a heart attack.

Makar

The state’s “heart-lung law” creates a presumption that heart attacks for court officers are work-related, in most cases. But the court noted that Sargent did not undergo a physical exam when he was promoted from part-time to full-time, even though he had spent one a year before at the sheriff’s office, and a second exam physical was not required by the employer.

The judges may have followed the letter of the law, but the newspaper called the decision “as cruel as it gets.”

The dissenting opinion of Justice Scott Makar can be viewed here.

Topics
Florida

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Samuel Hale Creates Workers’ Compensation Captive https://paydayloansvmr.com/samuel-hale-creates-workers-compensation-captive/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:07:50 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/samuel-hale-creates-workers-compensation-captive/

Samuel Hale, an employer carve-out organization, will insure its $50 million workers’ compensation risk through an insurance captive run by A+-rated Arch Insurance, beginning on July 1, 2022.

“We’ve been working on this for six years,” said Samuel Hale general manager Michael DiManno. “The captive arrangement will allow us to maximize the benefits of our carve-out agreement which dictates the economics of our business.”

California has a very high litigation rate on workers’ compensation insurance claims compared to the rest of the country. According to the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau, California spends as much money on friction costs associated with litigation as it does on reimbursing injured workers’ wages, making it one of the most expensive states in the United States. for workers’ compensation premium.

Exclusions have been created by the Department of Workers’ Compensation to allow approved entities to handle their claims disputes through Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) instead of the overburdened court system. ADR, compensatory claims are settled quickly and employees receive their money faster, while insurers can avoid the exorbitant costs of the slow legal system.

“This captive gives us a 10-year horizon on workers’ compensation[ensation]which creates long-term stability for our clients in a very precarious financial climate,” said DiManno. “We now have maximum control over our program and can deploy the best cost containment services based on our specific needs.

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Oswego County Workers Compensation Claims Committee – Oswego County Today https://paydayloansvmr.com/oswego-county-workers-compensation-claims-committee-oswego-county-today/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:05:40 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/oswego-county-workers-compensation-claims-committee-oswego-county-today/
Oswego County logo.

OSWEGO – The Oswego County Workers’ Compensation Claims Committee will hold a meeting on June 21, 2022. Here is information regarding the event:

  • OSWEGO COUNTY WORKERS COMPENSATION COMMITTEE
  • June 21, 2022 at 1:30 p.m.
  • County Office Building, 4e Floor, Conference Room E, 46 East Bridge St., Oswego, NY

Please note that the Oswego County Workers Compensation Claims Committee will hold a regular meeting at the date and time above to conduct the business listed in the agenda attached to this notice:

Oswego County Self-Insurance Plan

For workers compensation

County Building – 46 East Bridge Street, Oswego, New York 13126

Telephone (315) 349-8285 – Fax (315) 349-8254

OF: Hon. James Weatherup, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly

DATE: June 16, 2022

RE: Oswego County Self-Insurance Plan for Workers Compensation Claims Committee

Tuesday, June 21, 2022 – 1:30 p.m.

AGENDA

  1. Call
  1. Proposed Executive Session – Public Officials Act § 105(1)(d) discussions regarding proposed, pending or pending litigation; Public Officers Act § 105(1)(f) the medical and employment history of a particular person or persons relating to plan workers’ compensation claim records that are confidential under the Public Officers Act workers’ compensation § 110-a.
  1. other business
  1. Adjournment

c: Richard Mitchell, County Attorney

Melissa Turner, Plan Secretary

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The Academy of Kobe Bryant, the fight against the compensation of the workers of the insurer give up https://paydayloansvmr.com/the-academy-of-kobe-bryant-the-fight-against-the-compensation-of-the-workers-of-the-insurer-give-up/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 20:07:00 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/the-academy-of-kobe-bryant-the-fight-against-the-compensation-of-the-workers-of-the-insurer-give-up/
By Ivan Moreno (June 15, 2022, 4:07 p.m. EDT) — Kobe Bryant’s basketball academy and his insurer have asked the Ninth Circuit to dismiss their appeal to reopen a settled lawsuit over the 2020 helicopter crash who killed the basketball star and eight others who were seeking to recover workers’ compensation paid to a deceased academy employee.

Sports Academy, Sports Academy LLC and The Hartford on Tuesday filed a motion to voluntarily dismiss their appeal, telling the court that the parties involved will pay their own costs and fees.

Christina Mauser – who died in the crash along with Bryant, her daughter and six others – was an assistant coach at Sports…

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Quebec homeworkers want compensation for high gas prices https://paydayloansvmr.com/quebec-homeworkers-want-compensation-for-high-gas-prices/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:14:32 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/quebec-homeworkers-want-compensation-for-high-gas-prices/

Thousands of health and social care workers who provide home care or travel to families’ homes for work have faced rising gasoline prices in recent months.

Their unions are now asking the government to agree on a compensation amount to make up the difference.

Usually, the allowances paid for the use of a vehicle for work purposes are adjusted in April and October of each year, explained Julie Bouchard, president of the Interprofessional Health Federation (FIQ), in an interview Monday.

She said she would like affected workers to receive compensation by the next review in October.

“We want to be able to agree on a compensatory amount that would cover the costs that some people have to pay out of pocket to make up for this inconvenience, to make sure they don’t have to pay out of their own wallets,” Bouchard said.

The compensation is 62 cents per kilometer since April 1 and 55 cents after 8,000 kilometres, the union leader said.

“It’s clearly insufficient,” she said.

The issue could concern nurses, nursing assistants, orderlies, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers and any other intervener who visits families.

“Some healthcare workers have complained directly to their managers, but it seems they [the managers] can’t help it either,” says Bouchard.

These workers have been informed that “it is under the jurisdiction of the Treasury and that they cannot give a compensatory amount, even if they know and understand the problem of the price of gas”, she said.

The FIQ also points out that the retention and recruitment of nurses and care workers is already difficult without this additional obstacle.

A petition has also been launched to support the cause, and it is listed on the National Assembly website. On Monday, the petition had nearly 3,000 names. The persons concerned must sign it before September 8th.

The other unions involved, also campaigning for compensation, are the Quebec Union of Service Employees (SQEES), affiliated with the FTQ, the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), affiliated with the FTQ, the Alliance du professional and technical health and social services personnel (APTS), the Federation of Health and Social Services (FSSS) affiliated with the CSN, the Federation of Professionals (FP) affiliated with the CSN, the CSQ and the Syndicat des Quebec government professionals (SPGQ).

Last week, rural and suburban mail carriers who work for Canada Post and who must use their personal vehicles to deliver mail demanded similar compensation due to rising gas prices.


This report from The Canadian Press was first published in French on June 13, 2022.

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Hourly.io Raises $27M in Series A Funding Round https://paydayloansvmr.com/hourly-io-raises-27m-in-series-a-funding-round/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:02:33 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/hourly-io-raises-27m-in-series-a-funding-round/

Schedule.ioa worker compensation and payroll startup, raised $27M in Series A funding led by Glilot Capital Partners via its Glilot+ seed fund. Additional backers include previous investors Uppercase letters, MS&AD companies, J Ventures and new to this round, Vintage Investment Partners and Result companies.

The Series A funding will help Hourly expand beyond the state of California, where it was founded. The company aims to expand its insurance platform nationwide.

Hourly’s user-friendly platform merges three complex products: time and attendance, payand work accident insurance— in one.

Traditionally, companies use annual payroll estimates to calculate workers’ compensation premiums. But changes in personnel, workload, hours or compensation often cause these estimates to vary considerably from reality. As a result, companies overpay or underpay their workers’ compensation premiums, often by tens of thousands of dollars.

Co-founder and CEO Tom Sagi experienced these issues firsthand while running a small business himself. He teamed up with Shay Litvak, a technologist with over 20 years of experience, to solve these problems and revolutionize the $50 billion worker compensation industry.

Lior Litwak, Managing Partner of Glilot+, Glilot Capital’s early growth fund, said, “Hourly.io is a game-changer for small businesses with a mobile workforce. The platform frees up thousands of hours spent on administrative work, eliminates surprise bills, and ultimately improves accountability. We are thrilled to join Hourly in its journey to completely revamp the workers’ compensation insurance industry.

Haim Sadger, a founding partner at S Capital who led Hourly’s seed round in 2019 and is the second-largest Series A investor, said: “Hourly is a shining example of what can be done when people talents come together with a clear vision. This vision is to create a platform that allows any business owner to manage all aspects of their hourly workforce in minutes using just a smartphone. They’ve built something really special, and the growth and positive feedback they’re seeing in the market is proof of that.”

“Schedule completely eliminates uncertainty because payroll and worker compensation are linked. Now companies know exactly how much their coverage costs,” Sagi said. “We’re excited to expand Hourly outside of California and give business owners across America a better way to pay their team, get a handle on their true labor costs, and better manage the insurance of their employees.”

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Barrios: Bringing COVID-19 to your spouse | Workers Compensation News https://paydayloansvmr.com/barrios-bringing-covid-19-to-your-spouse-workers-compensation-news/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 07:08:26 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/barrios-bringing-covid-19-to-your-spouse-workers-compensation-news/

By Barrios Brigget

Thursday, June 9, 2022 | 0

There is no doubt that COVID-19 has altered our existence as human beings. Around the world, the pandemic has affected every aspect of daily life. So it’s no surprise that we’re still seeing ripple effects in California’s workers’ compensation system.

Barrios Brigget

In March 2020, shelter-in-place orders went into effect across California. Two months later, the government revised restrictions and granted essential businesses, including the construction industry, permission to reopen.

Robert Kuciemba was one such “essential worker” who returned to work following the government’s revised stay-at-home order for Victory Woodworks Inc., a furniture and construction company in San Francisco.

Shortly after the business reopened, Kuciemba contracted COVID-19 and brought the disease home to his family. On July 16, 2020, Kuciemba’s wife also tested positive for COVID-19. As a high-risk person due to her age and health, Ms Kuciemba developed severe symptoms of the virus, leading to hospitalization. She was also placed on a ventilator for over a month.

The Kuciembas later filed a lawsuit against Victory, alleging that the company “knowingly transferred workers from an infected construction site to Mr. Kuciemba’s site without following the safety procedures required by the order. sanitary”. They sued Victory for negligence, negligence per se, and liability for negligence on the premises. Mr. Kuciemba also sued for loss of consortium.

The Kuciembas claimed as evidence that he contracted the virus at work their own strict adherence to San Francisco’s COVID-19 restrictions, including following all safety precautions and minimizing exposure to other people. They further reported that Mr. Kuciemba was the only person in their household who had frequent contact with people outside the household in the course of his work. The district court held that the doctrine of derivative harm excluded Ms. Kuciemba’s claims and that Victory had no obligation to her. The case was dismissed by the district court and the Kuciembas appealed.

For reference, the derivative injury doctrine stems from the Workers’ Compensation Act, which provides that workers’ compensation is the exclusive remedy for an employee’s workplace injury and, by extension, any claim of a third party that the court considers incidental to or derived from an accident at work of the employee.

To obtain its favorable decision, Victory relied on Salin v. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (1982), arguing that Mrs. Kuciemba’s claim that she contracted COVID-19 from her husband, who contracted COVID-19 at work, was derived from her husband. injury at work and should therefore be prohibited by the doctrine of derivative injury.

In contrast, the Kuciembas argued that the California Supreme Court had twice challenged the Salin case and that it had not been favorably cited by a California court in decades. The Kuciembas also argued that Snyder v. Michael’s Stores Inc. (1997) limits the doctrine of derivative harm to “claims that logically or legally require a plaintiff to prove harm to a third party, such as claims for loss of consortium or wrongful death.”

The allegations made by the Kuciembas are not new. The California 2nd District Court of Appeals recently ruled on a similar case in See’s Candies Inc. v. Superior Court (2021). Matilde Ek, an employee of See’s Candies, contracted COVID-19 and passed it on to her husband, who succumbed to the virus. Ek alleged that his employer failed to put in place adequate safeguards to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

See’s Candies filed an objection in the case, essentially saying there was no avenue of recourse for the plaintiff because her husband was not an employee of See. The court rejected the doctrine of derivative injury on the grounds that any injury sustained by Ms. Ek was irrelevant to the claim, as she did not have to become ill herself for Mr. Ek’s injury to occur. .

See’s Candies appealed the decision. The California Supreme Court denied the request to reconsider the case on the objection issue, allowing the case to continue on the merits. The Supreme Court has yet to determine whether See’s Candies was negligent, and therefore liable, for the death of the plaintiff’s wife.

In Kuciemba, the court discussed the factual similarities with the See case. The See’s court essentially agreed with the Kuciembas’ interpretation of the Snyder case in finding “that the derivative injury rule does not preclude claims brought by an employee’s spouse against an employer for injuries resulting from COVID-19 infection in the workplace”.

The court further noted that Snyder is factually different from these two recent cases. Nor is there any determinative precedent that addresses the issue of whether Victory owed a duty of care to Ms. Kuciemba.

California law states that every person in the state “shall be liable, not only for the result of his willful acts, but also for injury to another caused by his lack of ordinary care or skill.” California courts have limited the duty to prevent infinite liability, but no court has determined whether an exception should be made for employers who negligently infect their employees’ household members with COVID-19.

The Kuciembas also relied on Kesner v. Superior Ct. (2016), where the California Supreme Court refused to make an exception for employers who negligently allowed employees to bring asbestos fibers home to their families. Although the cases are similar, the Kuciemba court deferred to the California Supreme Court.

The Kuciemba court asked the California Supreme Court to answer two questions:

  1. If an employee contracts COVID-19 at work and brings the virus back to their spouse, does California’s derivative injury doctrine prohibit the spouse’s claim against the employer?
  2. Under California law, does an employer have a duty to the households of its employees to exercise ordinary care to prevent the spread of COVID-19?

We await a decision on whether the California Supreme Court will grant the petition for review or if it will deny the petition for review, as we saw in the See’s case. If the Supreme Court upholds the district court’s decision, the derivative harm doctrine applies and claims such as Ms. Kuciemba’s will fall under the exclusive jurisdiction of the workers’ compensation system under the recourse rule. exclusive.

However, if the Supreme Court disagrees with the district court’s decision, the Kuciembas’ case will continue in civil court, at least temporarily, as it is strongly expected that Victory will then appeal.

Clearly, employers across California should watch with interest.

Brigget Barrios is associate attorney in the Sacramento office of the workers’ compensation defense firm Laughlin, Falbo, Levy & Moresi LLP.

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McLennan Co. commissioners approve a petition calling for the creation of an emergency services district in nearby Elm Mott https://paydayloansvmr.com/mclennan-co-commissioners-approve-a-petition-calling-for-the-creation-of-an-emergency-services-district-in-nearby-elm-mott/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:10:00 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/mclennan-co-commissioners-approve-a-petition-calling-for-the-creation-of-an-emergency-services-district-in-nearby-elm-mott/

McLENNAN COUNTY, Texas (KWTX) – McLennan County commissioners on Tuesday laid the preliminary groundwork for a proposed tax-funded emergency services district to serve the Elm Mott, Chalk Bluff and Lincoln City areas.

Commissioners approved a petition with just over the required 100 signatures from residents of the 37-square-mile area and set a public hearing for July 19 to discuss the possible creation of the new emergency services district.

If the commissioners approve the proposal after hearing comments at the public hearing, they will call an election to see if voters living in the proposed district would approve of a tax increase to support fire and emergency services for this area of ​​McLennan County.

About 336 emergency service districts have been approved in 96 counties since the Texas Legislature authorized the districts in 1989. If commissioners hold the election and voters approve, those living in the area could be assessed up to ‘at an additional 10 cents per $100 of assessment, or about $300 per year for a house worth $300,000.

To call the election, the commissioners must determine that the creation of the district is “feasible”, that it will benefit the district, that it will ensure the safety, welfare and convenience of the public, and that it will contribute to the conservation of real estate or natural resources in the proposed neighbourhood.

The proposal was presented to the county by Casey Perry, chief of Elm Mott Fire & Rescue, a 24-member volunteer unit that recently absorbed additional coverage area when the Chalk Bluff Volunteer Fire Department disbanded. in December due to financial difficulties.

Volunteer fire departments are routinely hampered by financial constraints, with most relying on a small county stipend, donations, and fundraisers to maintain operating budgets.

“We’re going to use a nearby career fire department as an example,” Perry said. “It has an annual budget for a single station of $1.1 million. As the McLennan County Volunteer Fire Department, we operate on $6,599 from the county per year and receive an additional $30 per square mile we cover. It doesn’t even begin to cover our fuel budget, it doesn’t cover our operating expenses such as organization general liability, vehicle insurance, workers compensation, medical malpractice, etc. The rest is donations and fundraising, and 10-20% of the annual fundraising comes from the pockets of our members.

PROPOSED EMERGENCY SERVICES DISTRICT BOUNDARIES IN THE ELM MOTT, CHALK BLUFF AND LINCOLN CITY AREAS

Emergency Services District in McLennan County(KWTX)

Perry said if the district is approved, county commissioners will appoint five commissioners to oversee its operation, including reviewing regular financial audits.

“Let’s just put it in layman’s terms,” ​​Perry said. “I worked all my life to be able to buy my house, my valuables, my assets. I devoted a lot of time and energy to it. What would you do to protect that? ESD is the easiest way to protect these assets. In addition, we are putting more checks and balances in place. Commissioners will appoint Commissioners to oversee operations. We are asking for more oversight and we are asking the community to reinvest in itself.

Parts of the proposed new district are in the offshore jurisdictions of Waco and Lacy Lakeview, and leaders of those towns would also have to approve its creation, said McLennan County Administrator Dustin Chapman.

Commissioner Will Jones, whose Precinct 3 would encompass the proposed Emergency Services District, said at this stage he was neither for nor against the petition.

“I still think there’s a lot of work to be done in terms of feasibility and stuff like that,” Jones said. “It’s ultimately up to the voters to decide. There are hurdles to get from there to here. But it will absolutely raise taxes in the Chalk Bluff-Elm Mott area. Absolutely.”

McLennan County Judge Scott Felton said he hoped to gauge what area residents think of the proposal during the July 19 public hearing.

“Sometimes people participate and share their opinions and others don’t and then complain about the results.” Felton said. “I urge them to come together and think and think about the pros and cons and make sure they voice their opinions and keep the court informed.”

Perry said his Elm Mott volunteers responded to 288 calls for service last year. So far this year they have been called 226 times, he said, predicting that number could reach 500 to 600 calls before the end of the year.

“With the population boom that McLennan County has experienced, particularly the commercial growth along I-35, the county’s needs exceed the capacity of what the fire departments can currently provide,” Perry said. “It’s something the community needs to think about. It was difficult for us. As the needs of the community continue to grow, we are still struggling to fund it.

Copyright 2022 KWTX. All rights reserved.

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Hourly.io, the Compensation and Payroll Platform for Hourly Workers, Announces $27M Series A https://paydayloansvmr.com/hourly-io-the-compensation-and-payroll-platform-for-hourly-workers-announces-27m-series-a/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 17:14:00 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/hourly-io-the-compensation-and-payroll-platform-for-hourly-workers-announces-27m-series-a/

Every hour to expand beyond California and expand its insurance operation nationwide

PALO ALTOCalifornia. , June 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Schedule.ioa fast-growing worker compensation and payroll startup, today announced that it has raised $27 million in a Series A financing led by Glilot Capital Partners via its Glilot+ seed fund. Additional backers include previous investors Uppercase letters, MS&AD companies, J Ventures and new to this round, Vintage Investment Partners and Result companies.

Series A funding will help Hourly expand beyond the state of California, where it was founded. The company aims to expand its insurance platform nationwide.

Hourly’s user-friendly platform merges three complex products: time and attendance, payand work accident insurance— in one.

Traditionally, companies use annual payroll estimates to calculate workers’ compensation premiums. But changes in personnel, workload, hours or compensation often cause these estimates to vary considerably from reality. As a result, companies overpay or underpay their workers’ compensation premiums, often by tens of thousands of dollars.

Co-founder and CEO Tom Sagui experienced these problems when he ran a small business himself. He partnered with Shay Litvaka technologist with more than 20 years of experience, to solve these problems and revolutionize the $50 billion workers compensation industry.

Lior LitwakManaging Partner of Glilot+, Glilot Capital’s early growth fund, said, “Hourly.io is a game-changer for small businesses with a mobile workforce. The platform frees up thousands of hours spent on administrative work, eliminate surprise bills and ultimately improve liability We are excited to join Hourly on its journey to completely revamp the workers’ compensation insurance industry.”

Haim Sadgera founding partner of S Capital who led Hourly’s funding round in 2019 and is the second largest Series A investor, said: “Hourly is a shining example of what can be achieved when talented people come together with a clear vision. This vision is to create a platform that allows any business owner to manage all aspects of their hourly workforce in minutes using just a smartphone. They’ve built something really special, and the growth and positive feedback they’re seeing in the market is proof of that.”

“Schedule completely eliminates uncertainty because payroll and worker compensation are linked. Now companies know exactly how much their coverage costs,” Sagi said. “We are delighted to expand Hourly from California and give business owners across America a better way to pay their team, control their true labor costs, and better manage their workers’ compensation insurance. »

About time

Based at Palo Alto, California, Hourly.io is an insurtech start-up offering full-service wage and salary insurance for small and medium-sized businesses employing hourly workers. Powered by real-time data, Hourly’s platform ensures payroll execution is as fast as the push of a button and you get accurate worker compensation bonuses down to the penny. . For more information, visit www.hourly.io.

SOURCE Hourly, Inc.

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More adults with long COVID, CDC report says https://paydayloansvmr.com/more-adults-with-long-covid-cdc-report-says/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 05:48:00 +0000 https://paydayloansvmr.com/more-adults-with-long-covid-cdc-report-says/

PORTLAND Ore. – More and more people are suffering from long-term health problems due to COVID. That’s according to the CDC’s latest report showing that one in five adults ages 18 to 64 has a health condition that could be due to COVID, and it’s one in four for those 65 and older.

“I’m much better than a year or even six months ago, but I still have residual symptoms like brain fog, fatigue, intermittent temperatures,” said Chelsea Alionar, who FOX 12 spoke to. for the first time in 2020.

Alionar is now back to working full-time, remotely, and has resumed some of the things she loves like hiking and paddle boarding, although they are still hard for her to do.

“The fatigue is like a weight blanket on me all the time,” she said.

Juli Fisher is in the same boat. She contracted COVID while working as a traveling nurse in April 2020 in Connecticut. She stayed in a hotel for six weeks, made several trips to the hospital, until she could finally go home.

“Once I tested negative, the worker lineup said, ‘OK you’re all better, you can go back to work,’ and they stopped paying me, but I never got better. “Fisher said.

Two years later, and after trying every therapy she can think of, she still has symptoms.

“I still haven’t returned to work. I gained over 100 pounds just from inactivity. I can do activity for about 4 minutes and then my lower back starts spasming very violently and I get out of breath very quickly. I always use oxygen at night,” she said.

She is also undergoing testing as part of OHSU’s long-running COVID-19 program, which has treated 750 patients since its launch in March last year.

Kaiser’s has had more than 600 referrals in its long-distance clinic, and Providence has seen 500 patients, ranging from children to people in their 90s.

“It’s not at all surprising to me,” Alionar said. “I think any long-time COVID survivor knew this was coming. We predicted it almost from the start and I’m hugely encouraged by whoever has to suffer from it.

“I just hope and pray that I start feeling better,” Fisher said.

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