More adults with long COVID, CDC report says

PORTLAND Ore. – More and more people are suffering from long-term health problems due to COVID. That’s according to the CDC’s latest report showing that one in five adults ages 18 to 64 has a health condition that could be due to COVID, and it’s one in four for those 65 and older.

“I’m much better than a year or even six months ago, but I still have residual symptoms like brain fog, fatigue, intermittent temperatures,” said Chelsea Alionar, who FOX 12 spoke to. for the first time in 2020.

Alionar is now back to working full-time, remotely, and has resumed some of the things she loves like hiking and paddle boarding, although they are still hard for her to do.

“The fatigue is like a weight blanket on me all the time,” she said.

Juli Fisher is in the same boat. She contracted COVID while working as a traveling nurse in April 2020 in Connecticut. She stayed in a hotel for six weeks, made several trips to the hospital, until she could finally go home.

“Once I tested negative, the worker lineup said, ‘OK you’re all better, you can go back to work,’ and they stopped paying me, but I never got better. “Fisher said.

Two years later, and after trying every therapy she can think of, she still has symptoms.

“I still haven’t returned to work. I gained over 100 pounds just from inactivity. I can do activity for about 4 minutes and then my lower back starts spasming very violently and I get out of breath very quickly. I always use oxygen at night,” she said.

She is also undergoing testing as part of OHSU’s long-running COVID-19 program, which has treated 750 patients since its launch in March last year.

Kaiser’s has had more than 600 referrals in its long-distance clinic, and Providence has seen 500 patients, ranging from children to people in their 90s.

“It’s not at all surprising to me,” Alionar said. “I think any long-time COVID survivor knew this was coming. We predicted it almost from the start and I’m hugely encouraged by whoever has to suffer from it.

“I just hope and pray that I start feeling better,” Fisher said.

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